Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

Task 6 - Implementing Your Game

Category

Barry Stanton▸ Task 6 – Implementing Your Game

#exploreTask6

I challenged students to create a computer game using Scratch(R). We discussed the types of games, elements they need to think about and discussed elements of coding over a two week period.

Some students found examples on-line which let me lead into a discussion about incremental and modular development and testing when we compared the initial code we had developed with the final versions of those games.

The four period…

0

Peita Bates▸ Task 6 – Implementing Your Game

Focusing on the first point here 'A discussion of how your students approached the implementation process and their key difficulties'.

Lack of confidence / resilience / what ever you want to label it as. Similar to another comment, the ability to keep the bigger picture in mind and not become disheartened is one of the biggest issues. Students dont know how to give effective, detail orientated feedback and then the creator is left with a sense of no real direction on how to improve.

0

Jotham Kingston▸ Task 6 – Implementing Your Game

I interviewed my 14 y.o. homeschool son for this one. He was working on a computer game using Unity. "It was the bones of a game," he says, "But I didn't finish it… I do know enough to know how to make a basic shooter."

Initially, he said he didn't have a process for creating computer games, but then when I quizzed him about Unity and Scratch he said the following:
a) Plan everything out – get a piece of paper and draw everything out, artwork and rules.
b) Do research, to learn to code elements you're not sure of, e.g…

0

Brendon Carvill▸ Task 6 – Implementing Your Game

I have been working through this 9-10 Mooc program fairly quickly to get my head around the scope for using it in the classroom. I haven't yet developed to the point where implementing the game is an option. However, I would like to see student implement their games through a product launch type scenario where, they are responsible for developing a group presentation that really promotes their game.

0

Read more

Jonathan Sargent▸ Task 6 – Implementing Your Game

#exploreTask6

In past classes where I have taught Game Design, all my students have followed the Design, Develop and Evaluate (DDE) cycle. Student have usually been taught the basics of Game Maker or Scratch before being taught how to document their work. This is to get them interested in the work as well as skilling them for the development of the game. T For assignment and assessment work I would have them do the following;

Design

Cr…

0